pmclips.com

Online Promotion of Composers and Performers since 1995

Blog Archive:

John Adams: The Wound-Dresser

Posted on
Categories:
Tags:

Saturday 28 April 2018, Barbican, London at 7.30pm

The BBC Singers perform Ravel, Adams, Vaughan Williams and Harris (UK premiere)

Programme

Maurice Ravel
Le tombeau de Couperin
John Adams
The Wound-Dresser
Ralph Vaughan Williams
Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis
Ross Harris
Face

 

Allison Bell – soprano
James Way – tenor
Marcus Farnsworth – baritone
BBC Singers
Gergely Madaras – conductor
BBC Symphony Orchestra

The role of those who care for the injured provides the theme: Ralph Vaughan Williams, like Maurice Ravel, was too old to serve in the First World War but he volunteered as a stretcher bearer while the Frenchman drove munitions lorries behind the lines, putting himself in extreme danger. His Le tombeau de Couperin remembers friends killed in the First World War.

John Adams’s The Wound Dresser, for baritone and orchestra, sets words by Walt Whitman who tended the wounded in battle, while Ross Harris’s celebrates the work of fellow New Zealander, the plastic surgeon Harold Gillies who pioneered facial reconstruction and contributed to the rehabilitation of thousands of servicemen.

Face, receiving its UK premiere is a work for soloists, chorus and orchestra with projections.

Book Tickets

Singers at Six: Choral Elgar

Posted on
Categories:
Tags:

Friday 13 April 2018 St Giles’ Cripplegate, London at 6.00pm

The BBC Singers perform Elgar

Programme

Edward Elgar
4 Choral Songs, Op 53
Ave maris stella
Imperial March
The Light of Life, no 2 “Seek Him that maketh the seven stars’
They are at rest
Give unto the Lord, Op 74

Eamonn Dougan
conductor
Stephen Disley
organ

Smaller scale choral Elgar that finds the composer lifting some beautiful British poetry as well as sacred texts into song.

Edward Elgar’s feeling for poetry, and particularly the poetry of his own time, stimulated his composition. And while many of his choral works were written on a grand scale, he left a substantial body of small works, many of them written as test pieces for the then very popular choral competitions. Tonight’s BBC Singers programme gives us a handful of them, including the four choral songs of his Op 53, settings of Tennyson, Byron, Shelley and a poem he wrote himself, The Owl, which brought forth one of his most harmonically advanced pieces. Organist Stephen Disley plays Elgar’s Imperial March written for the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria in 1897.

Book Tickets

Tea-Time Concert – Bristol Ensemble

Posted on
Categories:
Tags:

Sunday 15 April 2018, Christ Church, Newmarket Road, Nailsworth at 3.00pm

Bristol Ensemble perform works by Clara Schumann and Felix Mendelssohn

Clara Schumann Piano Trio in G minor Op.17
Felix Mendelssohn Piano Trio No. Op.49

As part of our Notes for Women project celebrating the music of female composers, April’s recital features Clara Schumann’s lyrical and elegant Piano Trio, together with Felix Mendelssohn’s well-loved first piano trio, one of his best-known works. Tickets £10 on the door.

Contemporary Music For All

Posted on
Categories:
Tags:

Saturday 21 April 2018, St Thomas of Aquins High School, Edinburgh – all day

Join the Hebrides Ensemble as part of the CoMA Edinburgh 2018 Festival

Hebrides Ensemble

Contemporary Music For All
Singers and Instrumentalists: Come and join us for a day of music-making
Be Part of the Future of Music

Do you love new music? Do you enjoy playing an instrument or singing? Then join Hebrides Ensemble for a day of inspiring and surprising music-making in this unique celebration of the UK’s flourishing new music culture. As part of the Contemporary Music for All 2018 Festival, you will have the chance to rehearse and perform alongside Hebrides Ensemble musicians led by conductor and Hebrides Ensemble’s Artistic Director, William Conway and Violinist, James Clark.

Applications to take part are invited from all instrumentalists and singers aged 16 or over and of grade 5 standard or above. The repertoire will include a new commission by Nigel Osborne for orchestra and choir.

You can be part of it!

Dates: Saturday 21st April
Schedule: 9.30 registration
10.00 – 13.00 Rehearsals
13.00 – 14.00 Lunch
14,00 – 16.30 Rehearsals
17.00 – Informal Concert

Venue: St Thomas of Aquins High School, 2 – 20 Chambers St, Edinburgh EH3 9ES

Fee: £25 full price, £15 unemployed, disability and student

Download the application form here

A Wonderful Day

Posted on
Categories:
Tags:

Friday 20 April 2018, Stoller Hall, Chetham’s School of Music, Manchester, 7.30pm

Psappha in Performance

Programme
Anna Clyne A Wonderful Day
Fausto Romitelli Amok Koma
Mike Walker Autonomy (World première)*
Steven Mackey Deal

Stephen Barlow Conductor
Mike Walker Electric guitar
Iain Dixon Reeds
Mike Smith Drums
Psappha Ensemble
Overview

Psappha explores the connections between jazz, rock and classical. The centerpiece is a new work by the renowned jazz guitarist and composer Mike Walker. Psappha is joined by Mike and reeds player Iain Dixon in a piece that combines classical music with the improvisation and rhythmic drive of jazz. Mike also joins us as the soloist in Steven Mackey’s Deal, which intertwines rock and classical.

Romitelli’s palindromic work draws inspiration from German punk rock while Clyne’s A Wonderful Day features a recording of a Chicago street musician whose natrural, slow voice conveys a sense of both joy and struggle.

*Mike Walker’s new work is supported by Arts Council England’s Grants for the Arts programme.

BUY TICKETS

Sacred Debussy with the CBSO

Posted on
Categories:
Tags:

Saturday 24th March, Symphony Hall, Birmingham, 7.00pm

Symphony Hall, Symphony Hall, 8 Centenary Square, Broad Street, Birmingham, B1 2EA

Mirga Gražinytė-Tyla

Debussy (orch. Matthews) La cathédrale engloutie, 5′
Bach Organ solo, 10′
Messiaen O Sacrum Convivium, 5′
Messiaen Dieu parmi nous, 10′
Debussy Danse sacrée et danse profane, 9′
Debussy Le Martyre de Saint Sébastien, 35′

“What rules do you follow?”

…asked Claude Debussy’s music teacher. “Pleasure,” he replied. But pleasure can unlock whole worlds. 100 years after his death, join Mirga Gražinytė-Tyla and the CBSO as they set out in search of the wonder, the power and the sheer beauty of music’s quietest revolutionary.

We’ll journey through sensual pleasures and sacred ecstasies, children’s games and bold new sounds, culminating in a concert performance of Debussy’s fairytale opera Pelléas et Mélisande. It’s an adventure that’ll involve our entire musical family, plus musical groups from across the whole city.

BUY TICKETS

Rush Hour Romantics at St John’s Waterloo

Posted on
Categories:
Tags:

Thursday 15th March, St John’s, Waterloo at 6.00pm

Berlioz Cléopâtre
Schumann Symphony No.3 ‘Rhenish’
Jonathan Berman Conductor

This concert is free with no ticket required.

Schumann once wrote, admiringly, that Berlioz’s Symphonie fantastique was ‘written with drops of blood’. Both composers were ardent Romantics, eager to transplant their very souls into music. Both were entranced by all Beethoven had achieved whilst eager to prove themselves and outstep his shadow. You sense this in these works.

One hears young Berlioz’s own longing for recognition in Cleopatra’s appeal to the Gods for exaltation. Meanwhile, Schumann embarks on his own pastoral symphony, all the while seeking to detour from the path first trodden by Beethoven.

Part of Free Rush Hour Concerts

Psappha perform Boulez

Posted on
Categories:
Tags:

Thursday March 22nd 2018, Hallé St Peter’s in Manchester, 7:30pm,

Le Marteau sans maître – A twentieth century classic

Pierre Boulez - 1972  -  France / Ile-de-France (region) / Paris  -  Pierre Boulez, Paris, 1972  - Philippe Gras / Le Pictorium. Image shot 1972.

Takemitsu Towards the Sea
Tom Harrold New Work (World première)*
Berio Naturale
Boulez Le Marteau sans Maître

Jamie Phillips Conductor
Jessica Gillingwater Mezzo soprano
Psappha Ensemble

Meaning The Hammer Without a Master, Boulez’ iconic work is a classic of the twentieth century whose sonority and sense of time and direction were profoundly influenced by music from Asia and Africa. Rising star Tom Harrold’s new work has been commissioned by Psappha to complement the Boulez.

Berio’s Naturale pairs live musicians with recordings of Sicilian street vendors highlighting the contrast between flowing folk melodies and the raw, natural voice of the street singer. Takemitsu’s Towards the Sea recalls the ebb and flow of the ocean and was commissioned by the Greenpeace Foundation for their Save the Whale campaign.

*The Tom Harrold commission is supported by the Fidelio Charitable Trust.

Psappha: Demystifying New Music
Pre-concert film – 6.00pm – free to ticket holders
Barrie Gavin’s 2005 film: Pierre Boulez: Living in the Present. Learn more before you see it played. Come early, get a drink and settle into your seats for a special screening of this intimate portrait of a remarkable artist and his inspiration.

BUY TICKETS

Bach, the Universe and Everything

Posted on
Categories:
Tags:

Sunday 18th March at Kings Place, London, 11.30am

Steven Devine director
Ciara Hendrick alto
James Way tenor
James Newby baritone
Professor Kishan Dholakia guest scientist

Seeing Life in a New Light

Marvel at our extraordinary universe and the music of Bach with our new Sunday morning series for inquiring and curious minds, with divine music, lively conversation and stimulating science.

For this morning’s session we’re joined by Professor Kishan Dholakia from the University of St Andrew’s enticingly-named Optical Manipulation Group. A world-expert in the physics of light, he’s fascinated by how the science of photonics can use imaging to help unravel the mysteries of the brain.

Alongside Professor Dholakia’s talk, we’ll be performing one of Bach’s most varied cantatas, BWV 83. Mixing joyful arias with funereal sounds, it’s a rollercoaster journey celebrating the glories of life as well as the sadness of death.

Our very own Sunday service is a place to bond with music lovers and revel in the wonders of science. There is no better way to start a Sunday morning.

In this concert we’ll be playing Bach’s cantata Erfreute Zeit im neuen Bunde (Joyful time in the new covenant).

In partnership with the Institute of Physics.

BOOK TICKETS

OAE – The Corridors of Power

Posted on
Categories:
Tags:

Tuesday 27th February at Royal Festival Hall, Southbank Centre, London, 7.00pm

Lisa-Beznosiuk-OAE
Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment perform

Mozart Arias from La clemenza di Tito
Mozart Symphony No. 38
Haydn Scena di Berenice
Haydn Symphony No. 103 Drumroll

Ádám Fischer conductor
Stephanie d’Oustrac mezzo-soprano

What wins – love or duty?

Berenice is Queen of Palestine, set to marry the Roman Emperor Titus. But a change of political weather at home makes it impossible for the Emperor to marry a foreign queen. What wins out – love or duty?

Haydn turned this story into Scena de Berenice, a fabulous concert aria (classical music’s equivalent of the short story) told from the Queen’s perspective. As political wheels keep turning, how does she hold her own in increasingly hostile corridors of power?

A packed programme also explores Mozart’s great operas about power, La Clemenza di Tito.

Mezzo-soprano Stephanie d’Oustrac sings Berenice, while we’re joined once again by Ádám Fischer, one of the leading interpreters of Haydn’s music operating today.

BUY TICKETS

Bach, The Universe and Everything

Posted on
Categories:
Tags:

Sunday 18th February at Kings Place, London, 11.30am

Steven Devine director
Ciara Hendrick alto
James Way tenor
James Newby baritone
Professor Kishan Dholakia guest scientist

Seeing Life in a New Light

Marvel at our extraordinary universe and the music of Bach with our new Sunday morning series for inquiring and curious minds, with divine music, lively conversation and stimulating science.

For this morning’s session we’re joined by Professor Kishan Dholakia from the University of St Andrew’s enticingly-named Optical Manipulation Group. A world-expert in the physics of light, he’s fascinated by how the science of photonics can use imaging to help unravel the mysteries of the brain.

Alongside Professor Dholakia’s talk, we’ll be performing one of Bach’s most varied cantatas, BWV 83. Mixing joyful arias with funereal sounds, it’s a rollercoaster journey celebrating the glories of life as well as the sadness of death.

Our very own Sunday service is a place to bond with music lovers and revel in the wonders of science. There is no better way to start a Sunday morning.

In this concert we’ll be playing Bach’s cantata Erfreute Zeit im neuen Bunde (Joyful time in the new covenant).

In partnership with the Institute of Physics.

BOOK TICKETS

Hebrides Ensemble – Heading Eastwards (Banchory)

Posted on
Categories:
Tags:

Tuesday 13 February at 7.30pm Woodend Barn, Banchory
Hebrides Ensemble

Hebrides Ensemble perform
Bartók: Mikrokosmos (selection of movements)
Janáček: Dumka
Nigel Osborne: The Piano Tuner
Dvořák: Dumky Trio (Piano Trio No. 4 in E Minor)
Osborne: Adagio for Vedran Smailovic

Eastern European composers Dvořák, Janáček and Bartók travelled extensively, absorbing folk influences and imbuing their music with traditional forms. Nigel Osborne is one of the most travelled composers alive today whose thirst for foreign cultures has taken him all over the globe. In his piano trio The Piano Tuner, taken from his opera of the same name based on the intriguing Daniel Mason novel about a piano-tuner sent to the Burmese jungle to tune a grand piano, Osborne explores the synthesis between Western and south-east Asian tuning in this powerful piece.

BOOK TICKETS

Hebrides Ensemble – Heading Eastwards (Perth Concert Hall)

Posted on
Categories:
Tags:

Monday 12 February at 1.00pm, Perth Concert Hall
Hebrides Ensemble

Hebrides Ensemble perform
Bartók: Mikrokosmos (selection of movements)
Janáček: Dumka
Nigel Osborne: The Piano Tuner
Dvořák: Dumky Trio (Piano Trio No. 4 in E Minor)

Eastern European composers Dvořák, Janáček and Bartók travelled extensively, absorbing folk influences and imbuing their music with traditional forms. Nigel Osborne is one of the most travelled composers alive today whose thirst for foreign cultures has taken him all over the globe. In his piano trio The Piano Tuner, taken from his opera of the same name based on the intriguing Daniel Mason novel about a piano-tuner sent to the Burmese jungle to tune a grand piano, Osborne explores the synthesis between Western and south-east Asian tuning in this powerful piece.

BOOK TICKETS

Hebrides Ensemble – Heading Eastwards (New Galloway)

Posted on
Categories:
Tags:

Sunday 11 February at 3.00pm, CatStrand, New Galloway
Hebrides Ensemble

Hebrides Ensemble perform
Bartók: Mikrokosmos (selection of movements)
Janáček: Dumka
Nigel Osborne: The Piano Tuner
Dvořák: Dumky Trio (Piano Trio No. 4 in E Minor)
Osborne: Adagio for Vedran Smailovic

Eastern European composers Dvořák, Janáček and Bartók travelled extensively, absorbing folk influences and imbuing their music with traditional forms. Nigel Osborne is one of the most travelled composers alive today whose thirst for foreign cultures has taken him all over the globe. In his piano trio The Piano Tuner, taken from his opera of the same name based on the intriguing Daniel Mason novel about a piano-tuner sent to the Burmese jungle to tune a grand piano, Osborne explores the synthesis between Western and south-east Asian tuning in this powerful piece.

BOOK TICKETS

Salomon Orchestra Celebrate American Composers

Posted on
Categories:
Tags:

Monday 29th January 2018 at 7.30pm, St John’s Smith Square, London

Graham Ross, conductor

The Salomon Orchestra
Guest Conductor, Graham Ross

Programme:
Harbison – Remembering Gatsby (Foxtrot for Orchestra)
Bernstein – Symphony No.1: Jeremiah
Copland – Old American Songs First Set
Barber – Symphony No.1 in One Movement

Part of St John’s Smith Square’s Americana ’18 programme.

John Harbison’s orchestral foxtrot begins with an impression of the faraway green light on the East Egg dock, Gatsby’s yearn for the American dream, that would be shattered by corruption and excess. A tune from twenties style party music sketched for his abandoned opera on Fitzgerald’s novel forms the main foxtrot, culminating in fleeting references to the telephone bell and car horns signifying Gatsby’s fate.

Leonard Bernstein, who famously said for great things you need a plan and not quite enough time, completed his first symphony to a tight competition deadline on 31st December 1942. The first movement represents Jeremiah’s pleas to the people of Jerusalem to root out corruption or disaster would befall them, the second the sacking of the city, and the finale settings of Jeremiah lamenting the desolation. Bernstein refused suggestions to add an optimistic ending, and over his career he worked on the theme of corruption and a crisis in faith, to a conclusion that for renewal dogma and orthodoxy must be stripped away in favour of a fundamental belief in common humanity, as expressed in his eclectic Mass of 1971.

Benjamin Britten asked Aaron Copland to arrange some American songs for him and Peter Pears for the 1950 Aldeburgh Festival. These were such a success Copland arranged another set and orchestrated them all in 1957. The original set includes ‘Simple Gifts’, that was used to great effect in Appalachian Spring, and a children’s song ‘I bought me a cat’ complete with sounds of the barnyard and its animals.

Samuel Barber’s Symphony in One Movement is more universally symphonic similar to Sibelius’ approach and less overtly American than Copland’s later style. Lyrical and dramatic, it was in 1937 the first American music to be performed at the Salzburg festival.

BUY TICKETS

Caught in Treetops with Psappha

Posted on
Categories:
Tags:

Thursday 15th February 2018 at 7.30pm, St. Michael’s, Ancoats, Manchester

Programme

Charlotte Bray Caught in the Treetops*
Anna Clyne Paintbox
Robert Reid Allan The Palace of Light
Lucy Armstrong Space Adventure
Michael Cryne In Cloud Light
Will Frampton The Greening Variations
Bethan Morgan-Williams In Kenopsia
James Williamson Fault-Klang

Benedict Holland Violin*
Psappha Ensemble
Overview

The life-changing effects of the atomic bomb are explored in Anna Clyne’s immersive soundscape which combines recorded voice, breathing and other sound loops with a sonorous cello line.

Bound together by a sense of mystery and a relentless energy Charlotte Bray’s work for solo violin and ensemble responds to two contrasting lunar poems. The concert also showcases the next generation of talent with our pick of the best works from Psappha’s emerging composer schemes.

Psappha: Demystifying New Music
Pre-concert talk – 6.40pm – free to ticket holders
Learn more before you see it played. Come early, get a drink and settle into your seats for a special talk that will introduce you to the composers and the inspiration behind the music being performed tonight.

FIND OUT MORE

Slapstick Festival Silent Comedy Gala

Posted on
Categories:
Tags:

Friday 26th January at 7.30pm, Colston Hall, Bristol

Silent Comedy Gala Billboard

Bristol’s stand-out annual comedy celebration returns for a fourteenth edition at Colston Hall – a unique celebration of the best onscreen classic silent comedy, live music and guest appearances by living legends of British comedy.

The host for this year’s gala show is soon to be announced and the film programme is an incredible triple-bill of laugh-out-loud comedy classics all accompanied by world class live musical accompaniment.

Buster Keaton’s best loved and most innovative film Sherlock Jr (1924) joins Charlie Chaplin’s A Dog’s Life (1918) to headline the show with live music.

Sherlock Jr is accompanied by the world premiere of a new, semi-improvised score composed by Guenter A. Buchwald and performed by the renowned European Silent Screen Virtuosi and members of Bristol Ensemble. A Dog’s Life features Chaplin’s own composition for the film and will be performed by a 15-piece Bristol Ensemble conducted by maestro Guenter A. Buchwald.

Plus: Laurel & Hardy’s hilarious comedy short Angora Love (1929) and live performance from innovative, award-winning visual comedy performers The Kagools and with our exciting guest host this looks like being our finest and funniest Gala event to date!

£10.50 to £60.00 incl. booking fee

Gold Premium Ticket Package:
£60.00* (limited to 50)
Access to exclusive post-show VIP after show experience with complimentary drink
Gala merchandise souvenir
Commemorative VIP lanyard (for access to post-show drinks)
One premium ticket located in the stalls
Exclusive limited souvenir event poster (not for sale)
Souvenir mini-programme
*Including all booking fees

BUY TICKETS

Black Plays Bach Concerti

Posted on
Categories:
Tags:

Thursday 18th January 2018 at 7.30pm, Kings Place, London
Virginia Black harpsichord

Haydn Symphony No. 49 in F minor La Passione
Bach Concerto No. 4 in A, BWV 1055
Mozart Divertimento in F, K138
Bach Concerto No. 1 in D minor, BWV 1052

The Bristol Ensemble
Virginia Black piano

After a dazzling international career as a virtuoso harpsichordist, Virginia Black has turned full circle and returned to her roots as a pianist. Having played the Bach concertos on the harpsichord, Virginia has now teamed with the Bristol Ensemble, known for its work with outstanding international artists and soloists, to reprise the concertos on the piano. The Bristol Ensemble will perform as a small chamber orchestra for this concert, providing the perfect foil for the piano.

The contrast between the powerful and expressive D minor concerto and the exuberant passion of the A major concerto will provide a fascinating demonstration of the power of Bach’s mastery of the concerto format. Together, they form an exquisite demonstration of Baroque ensemble music–making. The evening will also include the Bristol Ensemble playing works by Haydn, the dark hued Symphony No. 49 and Mozart’s graceful and charming Divertimento in F major.

‘Virginia Black is a communicative artist, extrovert, colourful, spontaneous but with a deep sense of poetry.’ Gramophone
‘Black’s intimate style… yields arresting results… lilting, relaxed and gorgeously inflected.’ Gramophone

BUY TICKETS

Beethoven on the Southbank

Posted on
Categories:
Tags:

Sunday 4th February at 7.00pm, Royal Festival Hall, London

Marin Alsop

Beethoven Symphony No. 4
Beethoven Violin Concerto

Marin Alsop conductor
Nicola Benedetti violin

A musician always confounding expectations, violinist Nicola Benedetti performs with the OAE for the first time in this concert.

She’s joined by conductor Marin Alsop for a programme of Beethoven performed with pure unvarnished musicality.

Sandwiched between the complex Third Symphony and the iconic Fifth, Beethoven’s Fourth Symphony is a gentler, more intimate affair that harks back to older music and shows the distinct influence of Haydn.

Written in the same year as the Fourth Symphony, Beethoven’s only Violin Concerto was one of the first pieces written for the instrument on a large scale.

Enjoy this exploration of the variety of Beethoven’s music with two artists of international distinction.

BUY TICKETS

OAE play Bach at Kings Place

Posted on
Categories:
Tags:

Sunday 14th January 2018 at 11.30am, Kings Place, London

Bach Lobe den Herrn, meine Seele (Praise the Lord, my soul)

Steven Devine director
Charlotte Beament soprano
Nicholas Pritchard tenor
James Newby bass
Professor Helen F Gleeson guest scientist

Time and Vision

There’s a focus on time as this Sunday morning series helps launch Kings Place’s Time Unwrapped programme.

Joining the OAE is experimental physicist Professor Helen Gleeson, whose work explores how the structures of very tiny things affect things on a larger scale. She’ll be exploring issues of time and perception.

To mark the New Year, the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment will be performing Bach’s New Year cantata with its unusual scoring including timpani and three horns.

BUY TICKETS

Sign up now for tips and insights on how to improve your marketing and promotion and to receive our monthly newsletter.

http://healthlibr.com